How rare is an albatross (double eagle) in golf?

How rare is an albatross (double eagle) in golf?



With Daniel Berger, then Zach Johnson making albatrosses (they're not called double eagles!) in back-to-back days on the PGA Tour, you're probably wondering just how rare it is to make one.

Johnson's Sunday albatross 2 at Bay Hill was the 110th on the PGA Tour since the Tour began keeping those statistics since 1983. From 1983 to 2003, there were just 56. From 2004 onward, there have now been 54, including two in the last two days.

Among all golfers, there are typically 40,000 holes-in-one in a given year, with just a few hundred albatrosses, according to About.com. The odds, according to former USGA employee Dean Knuth, of making an albatross are about 1 million to 1. The odds of making a hole-in-one are around 13,000 to 1.



There have, in fact, been holes-in-one on par 5s in golf. More often than not, they've come on holes where there is a severe dogleg, allowing a player to blast over the curve of the hole directly to the hole location.

Here are a few examples of par-5 aces (which could be called "condors"):

  • Larry Bruce, 480-yard, dogleg-right fifth hole at Hope Country Club in Hope, Ark., in 1962
  • Shaun Lynch, 496-yard No. 17 at Teign Valley Golf Club in Christow, England, in 1995
  • Mike Crean, 517-yard, straight-on No. 9 at Green Valley Ranch Golf Club in Denver, Colo., in 2002

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