Tadd Fujikawa comes out as gay, becomes first known male out golfer
Golf Culture

Tadd Fujikawa comes out as gay, becomes first known male out golfer


SHARE THIS STORY



Tadd Fujikawa entered the public consciousness when he qualified for the 2006 US Open at 15 years old. He became the second-youngest player to make a PGA Tour cut when he got to the weekend at the 2007 Sony Open in Hawaii en route to a T-20 finish, and he turned pro that summer.

Since then, he's long struggled to gain traction in pro golf, playing last season on Mackenzie Tour - PGA Tour Canada. However, he's remained a cult favorite player for his stature, grit and gutsy style.



Fujikawa came out as gay in an Instagram post, becoming the first known male professional golfer to do so.

View this post on Instagram

*PLEASE READ* Coincidentally, today is world suicide prevention day. However, I was going to share this regardless. So...I'm gay. Many of you may have already known that.😅 I don't expect everyone to understand or accept me. But please be gracious enough to not push your beliefs on me or anyone in the LGBTQ community. My hope is this post will inspire each and every one of you to be more empathetic and loving towards one another. I've been back and forth for a while about opening up about my sexuality. I thought that I didn't need to come out because it doesn't matter if anyone knows. But I remember how much other's stories have helped me in my darkest times to have hope. I spent way too long pretending, hiding, and hating who I was. I was always afraid of what others would think/say. I've struggled with my mental health for many years because of that and it put me in a really bad place. Now I'm standing up for myself and the rest of the LGBTQ community in hopes of being an inspiration and making a difference in someone's life. Although it's a lot more accepted in our society today, we still see children, teens, and adults being ridiculed and discriminated against for being the way we are. Some have even taken their lives because of it. As long as those things are still happening, I will continue to do my best to bring more awareness to this issue and to fight for equality. Whether the LGBTQ is what you support or not, we must liberate and encourage each other to be our best selves, whatever that may be. It's the only way we can make this world a better place for future generations. I don't want this to be focused on me. I just want to spread love and acceptance to others who are in a similar situation. If anyone out there is struggling, please don't hesitate to reach out to me. YOU ARE LOVED AND YOU ARE ENOUGH...AS IS, EXACTLY AS YOU ARE!❤️ I can't wait for the day we all can live without feeling like we're different and excluded. A time where we don't have to come out, we can love the way we want to love and not be ashamed. We are all human and equal after all. So I dare you...spread love. Let's do our part to make this world a better place.🏳️‍🌈❤️💛💚💙💜


A post shared by Tadd Fujikawa (@taddy808) on

Timing his post with World Suicide Prevention Day, Fujikawa began:

"So...I'm gay. Many of you may have already known that. I don't expect everyone to understand or accept me. But please be gracious enough to not push your beliefs on me or anyone in the LGBTQ community. My hope is this post will inspire each and every one of you to be more empathetic and loving towards one another.

"I've been back and forth for a while about opening up about my sexuality. I thought that I didn't need to come out because it doesn't matter if anyone knows. But I remember how much other's stories have helped me in my darkest times to have hope. I spent way too long pretending, hiding, and hating who I was. I was always afraid of what others would think/say. I've struggled with my mental health for many years because of that and it put me in a really bad place. Now I'm standing up for myself and the rest of the LGBTQ community in hopes of being an inspiration and making a difference in someone's life.

"Although it's a lot more accepted in our society today, we still see children, teens, and adults being ridiculed and discriminated against for being the way we are. Some have even taken their lives because of it. As long as those things are still happening, I will continue to do my best to bring more awareness to this issue and to fight for equality. Whether the LGBTQ is what you support or not, we must liberate and encourage each other to be our best selves, whatever that may be. It's the only way we can make this world a better place for future generations."

This was a courageous revelation for the 27-year-old, as no male professional golfer has been known to come out. A number of female professionals have come out, paving the way for openly homosexual pro golfers. Hopefully there's a day when all people feel comfortable enough to be open about their sexuality and not fear potential repercussions -- professional or personal -- for it.

SUBSCRIBE AND WIN PEAKVISION SUNGLASSES!

New subscribers to our weekly email newsletter from October 15 through December 15 will be entered to win a pair of PeakVision sunglasses of their choice! PeakVision's Dual Zone technology prevents glare while offering unparalleled clarity that's perfect for golfers. The patented PeakVision lens enhances the golfer's ability to see the contours of the greens better with high-definition amber lens which provide three times the definition than the naked eye, and we want you to experience the difference for yourself. (Rules and regulations)


About the author

Ryan Ballengee

Ryan Ballengee is founder and editor of Golf News Net. He has been writing and broadcasting about golf for over a decade, working for NBC Sports, Golf Channel, Yahoo Sports and SB Nation. Ballengee lives in the Washington, D.C. area with his family. He used to be a good golfer.

Ballengee can be reached by email at ryan[at]thegolfnewsnet.com