Lazy Eye Syndrome: A potential reason why your putter has gone cold
Equipment Sponsored Posts

Lazy Eye Syndrome: A potential reason why your putter has gone cold


SHARE THIS STORY

Has your putter ever gone cold? One day, it's working great, and you feel like you're making everything in sight. The next, you couldn't drain a putt in one of those 8-inch Hack Golf cups.

Your first thought is that it's the putter. The magic is gone. Maybe the face is imperceptibly caving in. Perhaps the face insert has lost some material properties. The grip just isn't working anymore. You decide you have to trash the whole thing and start over. After a few rounds with an old putter you still have in your garage, you bite the bullet and think about spending $300 or more on a gorgeous, expensive putter. That'll help you get the stroke back, right?

No. It won't.



And it's not the putter that's let you down. It's probably your alignment. You have Lazy Eye Syndrome, and it afflicts millions of golfers every year.

Lazy Eye Syndrome isn't recognized by the medical community as a real disease, but most golfers intuitively know about LES. However, they think the problem lies with the putter. After all, when a golfer buys a new putter, they seemingly make everything. It's unbelievable. Then, over time, the efficacy of the putter tends to fade. For whatever reason, the putter starts to spray the ball around, and it leads to a lack of confidence on the greens which impacts a golfer's total performance.

What's really happening is that a golfer becomes too comfortable with their putter over time, and their alignment suffers because their brain is no longer stimulated enough to pay attention to their aim in the same way they once did. Since the brain isn't as engaged by the familiar, putts start spraying and frustration rises.

Most golfers don't need a new putter, then. They need something to restore how they interact with the putter -- something that will grab their attention again. Fortunately, Brainstorm Golf has done that with their Eye Align series.

The team behind the Happy Putter realized they could improve players' alignment by giving them unique, interchangeable alignment markers that could be swapped out with a few turns of an Allen wrench. Whether you choose the Eye Align classic blade or mallet, you'll get three alignment markers that have been most commonly favored by golfers who were fit by the Brainstorm team. You can then test the markers yourself to see which one you like best, slip it in and go play golf. You'll find the putter itself, with its blue PVD finish, is a striking beauty that also delivers the right feel and a proper roll.

Over time, you might see a dip in your alignment. Instead of shelving the putter or buying a new one, just switch out a new alignment marker for a handful of rounds. Your alignment should again be where it needs to make putts consistently. If the three that come with each putter aren't doing the trick, there are nine other markers in the Eye Align series to keep your brain engaged.

The Happy Putter Eye Align series has either the blade or the open mallet, and they sell for just $130 each. That means you're getting a great putter at a good value with research-backed technology that can help you putt better. GNN readers can save 10 percent on their purchase by using the code GNN10 at checkout!

SUBSCRIBE & WIN A MATT KUCHAR BRIDGESTONE GOLF PACK!

New subscribers to our weekly email newsletter in July will be entered to win 6 Matt Kuchar Bridgestone caps and two dozen Tour B XS golf balls!

Rules and regulations: By submitting your email address, you agree to join both the Golf News Net and Bridgestone Golf email lists. To be eligible for our prizes, you must remain a subscriber on our list through the end of the contest month. If your email address disappears, it worked!


About the author

Ryan Ballengee

Ryan Ballengee is founder and editor of Golf News Net. He has been writing and broadcasting about golf for over a decade, working for NBC Sports, Golf Channel, Yahoo Sports and SB Nation. Ballengee lives in the Washington, D.C. area with his family. He used to be a good golfer.

Ballengee can be reached by email at ryan[at]thegolfnewsnet.com