Ping introduces G410 driver, fairway woods, hybrids and Crossovers
Equipment

Ping introduces G410 driver, fairway woods, hybrids and Crossovers


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Ping has been making drivers that deserve more recognition among recreational golfers for the last several cycles. However, last year's G400 series was a big hit with professional golfers around the world, earning a spot in the bags of a lot of players, particularly those in the free-agent crowd. So there's clearly something to what Ping has been doing.

Now, with the G410 line, they're further updating and improving their offering that leads with more customized center of gravity settings and pushing the boundaries of driver moment of inertia.



Ping G410 drivers

There are two models in the G410 series: the Plus and the SFT, which stands for Straight Flight Technology.

In the G410 Plus model, golfers have three clear-cut positions to move the tungsten back weight along a track. There's a neutral position, then a draw and fade position that each moves the center of gravity 0.1 inches in each direction, with about 10 yards of correction. As important to Ping was the position of the weight. By having it at the very back of the clubhead, the MOI rating keeps pace with the G400, which was one of the most forgiving drivers of 2018. Ping didn't want to give up what they had in MOI to pull another lever.

On the G410 SFT, there's a single, fixed tungsten weight on the perimeter and a center of gravity positioned even further toward the heel for more slice correction. The driver is lighter, carrying a D1 swingweight (the Plus is at D3), to help a golfer square the face at impact.

Dragonfly technology and Turbulator technology, which have been a part of the crown-design story now going back several Ping driver generations, have been refined, too. The design now still offers the same stiffening of the head to improve ball speeds, but it is thinner and lighter to give more weight to be used in optimizing the center of gravity.

The T9S+ face is forged and created using a unique heat-treatment process to make the face as thin as possible for ideal flexing and higher ball speeds.


The adjustable hosel has been improved, as well. It's lighter and more aerodynamic, meaning there's less of a penalty for being able to dial in with an increased number of settings. There are now eight total settings, up from 5, by being able to go up and down 1.5 degrees and lie adjustments up to 3 degrees flat.

While Ping offers a variety of aftermarket shafts in the G410 drivers (Project X EvenFlow Black 75, Mitsubishi Tensei CK Orange 60), Ping is offering the next generation of their proprietary Alta CB shaft. The Alta CB Red 55 launches higher and has an 8-gram counterweight in the grip end of the shaft to increase the center of gravity to transfer more energy through a heavier head that doesn't feel that way in the swing.

The Ping G410 Plus and G410 SFT drivers retail for $540 each.

Ping G410 fairway woods, hybrids and Crossovers

Fairway woods

The lede with the fairway woods and hybrids and Crossovers is a push for distance and speed, while maintaining forgiveness and proper gaping. That starts with using C300 maraging steel in the faces of each of these clubs. The company is saying the face is able to flex about the width of the face insert itself, with the implication that the ball speeds are very strong.

With the fairway woods, the company chose to move the center of gravity slightly forward from the G400 series. Combined with a shallower face, the move in center of gravity offers higher ball speeds with the placement and slightly more stability. Like in the G410 drivers, a tungsten weight is located on the extreme perimeter of the sole to position center of gravity.

In addition to the standard G410 fairways, there is a SFT model that offers a draw bias with more heel-side weighting in a slightly larger head for MOI. The lofts are also 1.5 degrees higher to produce higher launch for golfers who struggle to get those clubs off the ground.

There's an LST (Low Spin Technology) 3-wood model, offering a smaller head (159 cc vs. 171 cc) and a lower-and-more-forward center of gravity to launch shots with less spin. This is for players with higher swing speeds or particularly spinny players.

All of the fairway woods have five adjustable loft settings and three lie settings.

The Ping G410 fairway woods run $310 each, and they come stock with the Alta CB Red shaft with several aftermarket options available for no charge. The offering is available in 3, 5, 7 and 9 woods in standard, as well 3, 5 and 7 woods in the SFT model.

Hybrids

The story with the G410 hybrids is they're the first Ping hybrid models to be adjustable. All of the hybrids have five adjustable loft settings and three lie settings. Meanwhile the C300 maraging steel face insert combines with a 17-4 steel body in a large profile than the G400 series. There's a back weight to drive down center of gravity for increasing launch and ball speeds.

All of the hybrids have five adjustable loft settings and three lie settings.

The Ping G410 hybrids run $270 each, and they come stock with the Alta CB Red shaft with several aftermarket options available for no charge. The offering is available 17-, 19-, 22-, 26- and 30-degree heads.

Crossovers

Obviously the Crossover is more iron-like, but the Crossovers in the G410 also use the same pairing of C300 maraging steel face insert and the 17-4 stainless steel body as the hybrids.

The G410 Crossover is more streamlined, with a smaller side-to-side profile and a narrower sole. The Crossover has a 30-gram tungsten toe weight to increase the MOI, which is more like a hybrid while offering the playability and look of an iron. Internal ribs stiffen the clubhead body and dial in acoustics.

The Ping G410 Crossovers run $248 each, and they come stock with the Alta CB Red shaft with several aftermarket options available for no charge. The offering is available 17-, 20- and 23-degree heads.

 

About the author

Ryan Ballengee

Ryan Ballengee is founder and editor of Golf News Net. He has been writing and broadcasting about golf for over a decade, working for NBC Sports, Golf Channel, Yahoo Sports and SB Nation. Ballengee lives in the Washington, D.C. area with his family. He used to be a good golfer.

Ballengee can be reached by email at ryan[at]thegolfnewsnet.com