TaylorMade Golf M5, M6 driver pictures hit USGA conforming list
Equipment

TaylorMade Golf M5, M6 driver pictures hit USGA conforming list



If you've been looking to see pictures of TaylorMade Golf's M5 and M6 drivers, intrigued by the driver's red screws on the face, the USGA conforming driver list is your friend.

The USGA conforming driver list is a great way to market to golf equipment aficionados (geeks, depending on who's speaking). When a driver appears on the list, an image of the driver sole shows up, and it's one of the first looks many golfers get of a new, highly-anticipated release. It also means the club has been approved for competition, so we're likely to see it in play right away.

It just so happens the PGA Tour kicks off 2019 this week at the Sentry Tournament of Champions in Hawaii, and there will be plenty of TaylorMade staffers there with the new M5 or M6 in the bag. Dustin Johnson is one such player, spotted by the PGA Tour testing the M5 at Kapalua's Plantation Course.

Meanwhile, here's what the M5 and M6 drivers look like as they appear on the conforming list, which is updated every Monday with the prior week's submissions.

As has been the case since the M line came out, the odd-numbered driver in the series (1, 3, 5) has been the one with a full set of adjustable features, while the even-numbered driver (2, 4, 6) has fewer options and is more geared toward a set low-and-back center-of-gravity profile.

Carbon fiber figures prominently in both drivers, as has been the case in the M Series. The sleeker silver look returns from the M3 and M4, which seems to have been better received than the white paint job. Honestly, it's all good to me. Just go far and straight.

TaylorMade M5 driver

The M5 driver has a different weight-adjustability track compared to the M3 driver. The M3 driver used a Y-shaped track with independent weight, while the M5 has a mushroom-shape track, with a full set of adjustments along the back curve of the sole. Forgiveness is more of an emphasis here.

The driver sole slot on the M5 is a bigger version of the Hammerhead shape found in the M3 and M4, with the function designed to deliver higher ball speeds across the face.

With the emphasis in this product line on increasing characteristic time (a proxy for energy transfer at impact), and the accompanying red face screws, it makes sense to increase the slot size across the face. The Speed Injected callout on the sole reminds the golfer that there's a special material behind the face to, as the tech story goes, bring the full face characteristic time up toward the USGA's limits.

TaylorMade M5 Tour driver

TaylorMade has typically offered a 440cc version of their odd-numbered M Series driver, and that's what the Tour version is. It's more compact. However, it doesn't have the 440 moniker, with TaylorMade going back to the Tour name.

The Tour has a similar channel to the M5 460 in terms of scale, but it's obviously more compact, as is the weight track. There's just less room to play with here. The more-compact shape has always been a personal favorite when testing TaylorMade's M Series drivers. They just fit my profile more. 

TaylorMade M6 driver

The TaylorMade M6 driver looks a lot like the original M2 in aesthetics. The weight keeps the center of gravity low and back. The channel is similar to the M5, and there's no track system for adjustability. For some players, this is going to be a better driver, regardless of adjustability.

About the author

Ryan Ballengee

Ryan Ballengee is founder and editor of Golf News Net. He has been writing and broadcasting about golf for over a decade, working for NBC Sports, Golf Channel, Yahoo Sports and SB Nation. Ballengee lives in the Washington, D.C. area with his family. He used to be a good golfer.

Ballengee can be reached by email at ryan[at]thegolfnewsnet.com