Zach Johnson is so famous he's a problem in a math textbook
Parparazzi

Zach Johnson is so famous he’s a problem in a math textbook

Zach-Johnson-math-textbook

You know you're famous when one of two things happens to you: There's a question about you on "Jeopardy!" or in a textbook. For Zach Johnson, he realized Monday the latter had happened.

A fan tweeted to Johnson a problem featuring the '07 Masters champion in a geometry textbook.


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Here's the problem:

[line-quote color="red"]Zach Johnson won the Masters Tournament in 2007. Use the Law of Syllogism to draw a valid conclusion from each set of statements, if possible. If no valid conclusion can be drawn, write no valid conclusion and explain your reasoning.

(1) If Zach Johnson’s score is lower than the other golfers at the end of the tournament, then he wins the tournament.
(2) If a golfer wins the Masters Tournament, then he gets a green jacket.[/line-quote]

And, so as not to leave you hanging, here's the answer:

[line-quote color="red"]The Law of Syllogism states that if p → q and p → r are true statements, then p → r is a true statement.

Let p = "Zach Johnson’s score is lower than the other golfers at the end of the tournament." Let q ="He wins the tournament." Let r = "He gets a green jacket."

Then by the Law of Syllogism "If Zach Johnson’s score is lower than the other golfers at the end of the tournament, then he gets a green jacket."[/line-quote]

(We didn't know what the Law of Syllogism is. Like we did throughout high school and college, we looked online and found the answer sheet, then copied that. Full credit!)

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